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The Revisability Paradox

Long-time readers will be familiar with “learning objects” and the “reusability paradox.” If you’ve been working in educational technology since…

The Musician’s Rule

It’s well established in the educational research literature that explicitly connecting new information to prior knowledge improves learning. So, let’s…

Clarifying and Strengthening the 5Rs

Despite my best efforts, I spent much of the recent holiday break thinking about the eviscerated definition of OER in the final version of the UNESCO OER Recommendation. As I fretted about the holes in the final language and the size of the various trucks you could drive through them, I also reflected on the […]

The Spirit of Open

Last year I created an un-styled, (hopefully) easy-to-reuse slide deck about Creative Commons, the 5Rs, and OER. I’ve been a vocal advocate for CC since the day it launched, and have been answering questions about the licenses for years. I helped design the new Creative Commons Certification course, taught the first two sections offered, and […]

Some of the Wonderful Things I Discovered in 2019

I suppose it’s time for end of year reflections. In many ways my year was dominated by three things – my family’s move from Utah to West Virginia, donating part of my liver to Cable, and closing down the annual Open Education Conference after fifteen years. Each of these took huge amounts of time and […]

Some Very Bad News about the UNESCO OER Recommendation

The tl;dr I recently wrote a brief essay about the wonderful new UNESCO OER Recommendation. That piece was based on the text of the most recent public draft (which I will call the “public draft” below), which many of us believed to be the document the 40th Congress unanimously approved. However, a number of extraordinarily […]

Some Thoughts on the UNESCO OER Recommendation

There’s great news out of the recent UNESCO meeting in Paris, where member states unanimously adopted the draft Recommendation on Open Educational Resources (OER). I want to highlight some of the parts of the Recommendation that caught my eye, reading both from a personal perspective as well as my Lumen perspective. First, and it will […]

Why We Should Expand Our OER Advocacy to Commercial Publishers

Preface Here’s a trivia question for you: which American organization has produced the largest number of open textbooks? Here’s a hint: they’ve produced more than double the number of books created by the next largest producer. Here’s another hint: they haven’t created a new open textbook since 2012. You may have thought the answer was […]

Some Thoughts about OER Research

I read an article back in June (reference below) that prompted some memories and catalyzed some additional thoughts. In the mid-late aughts and early teens, when I was still serving as chair for doctoral students, I often had conversations like this: Student (bursting into my office): I have an exciting idea for my dissertation research! […]

Different Goals, Different Strategies

I think Michael Feldstein is directionally correct in his analysis of what has been happening to “open education” for the past several years. Without wading into the labeling fray (are we a movement? a coalition? a community? a field? a discipline?) I’d like to add a bit of my own perspective. Where Michael sees three […]

An OpenEd Conference Update

After two amazing keynotes at #OpenEd19 this morning, I read the following statement to conference attendees:   In 2003 I invited a small group of about forty people interested in open content and open courseware to Logan, Utah. Since then, this annual meeting has grown year after year to where we are today – 850 […]

On ZTC, OER, and a More Expansive View

For the first decade of the modern open education movement (1998 – 2007), the distinguishing feature of our work – the thing we cared most about and talked most about – was the open licensing we applied to educational materials. MIT OCW, Rice’s Connexions, my group at USU, and others applied the new Creative Commons […]

It’s a Long Game After All

It’s a world of laughter A world of tears It’s a world of hopes And a world of fears There’s so much that we share That it’s time we’re aware It’s a long game after all. OER advocacy, like most work, is filled alternately with advances and setbacks. Speaking from firsthand experience, because I live […]